Wobbly Walk Free Speech Memorial

On February 16, 1911, over a hundred members of the IWW left Portland on freight trains bound for Fresno to join striking workers. The group consisted of young working men willing to die for free speech.  They risked being beaten or killed by strike breakers.  After being kicked out of the box cars in Ashland, nearly a hundred Wobblies made the hazardous trek south by foot through the snow-covered Siskiyous. By the end ot their trek the they had walked roughly 150 miles across the frozen Siskiyous.

The following words come from Jay Mullen’s written research  documenting the miraculous events which unfolded nearly 100 years ago:

“…to those men of conviction who voluntarily, for the cause of free speech, hit-the-grits and  disappeared into the snowfall to confront possible death, not in the face of hostile gunfire, but in the face of an indifferent nature’s blizzard. History forgets more heroes than it remembers.  Those Wobblies warrant memory.”

Professor Jay Mullen’s story about brave men of conviction whose solidarity stand for free speech is absolutely amazing and it needs to be remembered.  Once you know the history you will understand why a blue ribbon committee has been assembled to commemorate the 1911 Wobbly Walk Through the Siskiyous.

Wobbly Walk Through the Siskiyous – research report – 125K

Oregon Wobblies make mark with long walk for free speech – Oregonian

100 years after they ‘hit the grits’ – Medford Mail Tribune

Campaign to Create a Wobbly Free Speech Monument

Southern Oregon Jobs with Justice has a campaign to create a Wobbly Free Speech Monument be placed in the mountains along their historic route to commemorate and immortalize these workers virtuous trek.

WHAT:  Free Speech Monument Proposed for State of Jefferson
WHEN:  2011 — the Centennial of the Wobbly Walk Through the Siskiyous
WHO:  Wobbly Walk Free Speech Committee
WHY:  “Those Wobblies warrant memory”

The project of establishing a monument is inspired by the research of Southern Oregon University History Professor Jay Mullen and his work “Wobbly Walk Through the Siskiyous” . “Wobbly” is the nickname for a member of the labor union known as the Industrial Workers of the World.  Founded in 1905 the IWW rose to distinction during the progressive era of the early part of the 20th century.

Committee Members are from around Oregon and represent a very diversified group that includes labor educators, folk singers and even current dues paying Wobblies. The list of committee members:  Jay Mullen, Nancy Spencer, Gerry Cavanaugh, Marko Bey, Brenda Gould, Derek Volkart, Brendan Phillips, Ross Rieder, Susan Stoner, Wes Brain, Ivend Holen, Mark Ross, Barbara Byrd, Patrick Dodd, Rich Rohde, and Scott Fife.  Two elected politicians have been asked to be on the committee in an “advisory” role, Oregon State Representative Peter Buckley and Oregon’s Senator in Congress Jeff Merkley.

SOJWJ “Wobblies” perform in Ashland Oregon’s Tombstone Tales

Wobblies march on Dunsmuir

 

Wobbly Free Speech Memorial CD Order Page

 

 

[item image] LISTEN TO THE WOBBLY WALK RADIO PERFORMANCE

Professor Jay Mullen introduces our radio version of the Wobbly Walk performance.

Download Here  8 MB MP3

 

We Need Your Support!!

The Wobbly Walk Free Speech Monument is a campaign of Southern Oregon Jobs with Justice http://www.sojwj.org

Your tax-deductible donations can be made online HERE.  Or send donations to: Jobs with Justice Education Fund, 1325 Massachusetts Ave. NW, STE 200, Washington DC 20005. Be sure to memo your donation to the “Southern Oregon Jobs with Justice Wobbly Walk Memorial Fund”.

For more information contact Wes Brain, brain@mind.net or phone 541-482-6988

https://afl.salsalabs.com/o/4023/c/805/p/salsa/donation/common/public/?donate_page_KEY=7154

Wobbly Walk Media

The Wobbly Free Speech Memorial is a campaign to honor the actions of IWW workers over one hundred years ago. On February 16, 1911, more than a hundred members of the IWW left Portland on freight trains bound for Fresno, California to join in solidarity with striking workers. The group consisted of young working men willing to die for free speech. They risked hostile gunfire and assault by strike breakers. After being kicked out of the box cars in Ashland, nearly a hundred Wobblies made the hazardous trek south by foot through the snow-covered Siskiyous. By the end of their trek they had walked roughly 150 miles across the frozen Siskiyous.

This page is a gallery of the artwork we have created and has been created for us.

 "free speech" ~ artist Ellen Gabehart
“free speech” ~ artist Ellen Gabehart

ARTIST STATEMENT

Artist: Ellen Gabehart * * Creative Images Studio
 gabehart@efn.org * *  http://www.artisticmindonline.com/egabehart

I began drawing at three (before I knew what the word artist meant). My first professional art training began at the High School of Music and Art and the Art Student’s League of New York City. I studied composition, perspective and figure drawing. In Los Angeles, I continued to study drawing and painting at Choinard Institute.

My active political awareness began at California University in Northridge, Calif., when I joined the Student Rights Movement. At a rally I got arrested for promoting free speech and the integration of African American students. Feeling totally outraged I began to create political paintings about intolerance.

Being a member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and after reading several pamphlets about the sacrificial Free Speech Walk by the IWW members I felt compelled to paint “Free Speech” to celebrate the 100th anniversary of this event. I also have created paintings about saving the environment, prejudice, and the evil useless war promoted by George Bush, and “Hungry Hands” depicting the causes of world hunger.

I also create art work about my life in Mexico, and designs integrated with musicians. I am represented by the New Zone Art Gallery, Eugene, Emerald Art Gallery, Springfield, Mindpower Gallery, Reedsport, and Coos Art Museum in Coos Bay.

SOJWJ “Wobblies” perform in Ashland Oregon’s Tombstone Tales

[item image]

LISTEN TO THE WOBBLY WALK RADIO PERFORMANCE

Professor Jay Mullen introduces our radio version of the Wobbly Walk performance.
Download Here  8 MB MP3

 

Walk On Wobbly, Walk On…

Singer, songwriter Patrick Dodd composed this piece for the Wobbly Free Speech Memorial.

Download Here  11.5 MB MP3